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20121207
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
energy security, and then president obama marks 20 years that the united states and the soviet union reduced nuclear weapons. and then deductions that could be part of the negotiations over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> this weekend on c-span3's "american history tv," follow harry truman's eldest son, as they prepared to mark the dropping of the atomic bomb on 1945. >> i know everyone has their own view. i don't want to argue survival. i think we're past that. i want to do what i can to see that this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us to discuss the inspiration for his trip sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone.
to -- >> i want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. we stand on the shoulders and the time it takes to get these reports. the policy staff, james, leslie, the staff that puts these together, our political staff and the rest of the team at safe. we're seeing more production than we have ever seen before. the most production in the last couple of decades of year on year growth. oil imports are falling. the demand for oil continues to decline based on fuel economy standards and other reasons. we still continue to have a problem. the report we are releasing today and the subtitle says it all. harnessing american resources and innovation. how do we leverage this abundance we have in the united states to our maximum benefit? washington is talking about our fiscal crisis. the relationship of our oil needs to this crisis are close. it is unnecessary ingredients. every recession in modern times has been preceded by oil price hike. we can cut all we want and raise revenue, we will never find a way to solve our fiscal troubles. how do we leverage this gre
is cutting the top rate to 45%. more to ce like should washington sub di size wind energy? more on the fiscal cliff as americans on all levels have to prepare to take the tax hit. hope it doesn't, but i'm going to break it down next. ♪ gerri: i always like to give you the straight poop on everything, and, today, i'm concerned about the fiscal cliff. in the past two days, two very well-connected professional money managers have spoken to me about their trepidation their clients have about the expiration of the bush tax cuts and the cut backs on spending. money is worried, concernend many are selling as you've seen. to read the stories of the press on the fiscal cliff, well, you'd think change is on the horizon just 33 days away, well, it doesn't maer much. in fact, just sit back, relax. the fiscal cliff is not a big deal. i'll quote one here. it's unlikely all of these bad things happen or stay in effect for an extended period of time. pundits call if the fiscal cliff smoke that is, instead o a cliff, the rising support for junking the fiscal approach as confusing and renaming it the austeri
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, wedomestic energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. hi victor! mom? i know you got to go in a minute but this is a real quick meal, that's perfect for two! campbell's chunky beef with country vegetables, poured over rice! [ male announcer ] campbell's chunky soup. it fills you up right. olaf's pizza palace gets the most rewards of any small business credit card! pizza!!!!! [ garth ] olaf's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve the most rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! w
. engineered to move heaven and earth. guts. glory. ram. guts. glory. energy is being produced to power our lives. while energy development comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing generations of cleaner-burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self-contained well systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. with less chronic osteoarthritis pain. imagine living your life with less chronic low back pain. imagine you, with less pain. cymbalta can help. cymbalta is fda-approved to manage chronic musculoskeletal pain. one non-narcotic pill a day, every day, can help reduce this pain. tell your doctor right away if your mood worsens, you have unusual changes in mood or behavior or thoughts of suicide. antidepressants can increase these in children, teens, and young adults. cymbalta is not approved for children under 18. people t
, a growing player in renewable energy and nuclear energy. we thank them for their support. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or other means of filing -- to give you some time to think. there is no embargo, but c-span has agreed not to air the video of the breakfast until noon today to give those of you who actually paid to attend the breakfast time to file. finally, if you'd like to ask a question please do the traditional thing and send me a subtle, nonthreatening signal. with that, thanks again from our supporters and viewers. >> he always goes first. the times article was right about one thing -- the debt duo, if you want to know what we are really like, you can imagine sonny and cher. you can imagine which one i am. somebody once asked me, what was it like to be president of a university? i said it is like being ceo of a cemetery. you have lots of people underneath you. but nobody is listening. i thought i would update you -- yesterday i had a meeting with a group of ceo's that we took in to meet with the white house economic team and i subsequently had a
have scrambled regional power dynamics, and the energy revolution around the world will likely further change the region's strategic landscape in the coming years. indeed, america's increasing energy independence will have far reaching implications, not only for our economic future but for our security relationships around the world. fourth, economics are increasingly shaping international affairs alongside more traditional forms of national power. emerging powers like india and brazil are gaining clout because of their size, of course, but more the size of their economies than of their military. more about the potential of their markets than their projection of what we used to think of as power. meanwhile, the global economic system, open, free, transparent, and fair, that fueled unprecedented growth is now under unprecedented pressure. trade imbalances, new forms of protectionism, the rise of state capitalism, and crippling public debt. finally, the traditional sources of america's global leadership are in need of renewal. a task for all of us. the cottage industry of cassandras and
to inject some energy at the right place at the right time. so next up here will be senator sam nunn, longstanding chairman in senate armed services, who understands our country and our national security as well or better than anyone i have ever worked with. senator none -- senator nunn? [applause] >> well, first, thanks to pete peterson for getting this group together and for so much else that pete and michael and the peterson foundation have done in terms of bringing attention to the fiscal challenge we face and mobilizing support for a rational and sane fiscal policy. second, admiral mullen, thank you for your tremendous leadership both in the military and as a citizen in the recent months. you have led the way, and your statement that basically the biggest risk that we have to national security is our debt and our unsustainable fiscal policy is one that i totally endorse and agree with, and i commend you for making it, because your impact is very powerful. so that's my, really my first point. my second point is that even if we avoid the short-term debt crisis, the so-called cliff
. energy is being produced to power our lives. while energy development comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing generations of cleaner-burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self-contained well systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> welcome back. some of the top stories this morning. we are following developments happening now in cairo. the u.s. embassy there is closed. no one is being allowed in or out until further notice. protesters are blocking the entrance and clashes are happening nearby. there is no indication that the embassy is under any threat right now. >> now for a third straight day of violence in iraq at least 32 people killed in a series bombings there this morning. three of the bombs went off in mostly shiite communities and a suicide bomber hit a town in central fallujah. sectarian violence has
of these will spin out of the clean energy industry. sustained government investment in industries of the future, i think, is important. >> i was going to say if china is becoming more expensive because people are asking for higher wages, didn't we see the same thing when japan was a low-wage country, hong kong, isn't there always going to be a country like bangladesh with lower wages that production will shift, too? >> possibly, except china is so much a category of its own. the scale is the biggest in the world. the infrastructure is unique. you want to move things to burma, you have new airports in burma, you have no ports, no supply base. and so there is a particular category that china has. they are working out their problems. part is moving to china. but, also, i think things will come back to the u.s., too. >> so, sam was talking about clean energy. >> yep. >> and we've certainly seen barnicle talk for some time how the united states needs to catch up with china. they're making a huge investment. but let's talk about dirty energy. >> yes. >> only because we have such a revolution coming in t
a little bit. if you look at the percentage of investment, the exploration production of energy is very heavily involved, it is a very expensive item, and their profits are five to 8% on what they actually invest. microsoft and intel are much more profitable and they pay less in taxes than the percentage of the total revenue. so, people always focus on the gas prices. look at your heating bill. the natural gas movement brought down the price of natural gas about 80% of what we produce in terms of my state. it's about a quarter of what it was three years ago. that isn't always a good deal for the american people. it's actually bringing the industry back. this industry which is often vilified quite frankly is the one that is generating more jobs, more income, more opportunity than almost any other sector and it isn't as profitable as the high-tech. >> host: nelson in colorado springs. >> caller: i think the bush tax cut -- has anyone tried to calculate the amount of money that the economy lost when the tax cuts were putting place only 2% of the rich but you can't continue to pay the same
.com. energy is being produced to power our lives. while energy development comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing generations of cleaner-burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self-contained well systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> that's a bitter backlash from republicans, at least some republicans over the house gop proposal to keep the country from going over the so-called fiscal cliff at the end of the year. president obama says it doesn't go far enough, but republican critics say it goes way too far. dana bash is on capitol hill, watching all of this unfold. dana, what are you hearing? >> reporter: republican sources i'm talking to think maybe it's sort of the goldilocks scenario. if one side thinks it's too far, the other side thinks it's not far enough, maybe it's just right. the republican counteroffer
congressional leaders put much of their energy on the ongoing fiscal cliff negotiations. oklahoma representative tom cole who broke ranks with republicans by embracing president obama's plan to raise taxes on the wealthy stuck to his guns this morning. >> if we can give the american people an early christmas present, if they can listen to the debate instead of be worried that their own taxes are going to go up, i think that actually strengthens our hand. i haven't changed my mind. i'm not going to come out here and be disingenuous to people. i think it would be a step in the right direction. >> today john boehner expressed disappointment at where the negotiations stand. as our first read team points out, by siding with the white house tom cole may be helping boehner get the deal he wants. joining me now, political editor mark murray. why do you think tom cole has strengthened the speaker's position, negotiating position he goes in with? >> it has given john boehner some cover. you now have a conservativconse albeit establishment member of the house republican party who is essentially going to th
credit which expires at the end of this year. investing in renewable energy is creating new jobs, reducing our dependence own foreign oil and promoting economic growth. in pennsylvania, the wind industry supports 4,000 jobs and powers 180,000 homes, including in the pittsburgh area. the uncertainty surrounding the looming deadline to renew the p.t.c. has forced some companies to lay off employees, and if we let it expire, thousands of more hardworking americans will be out of work. two wind farm projects in western pennsylvania were already canceled this year. this is an issue where both sides can come together to do what's right for our country, letting the p.t.c. expire would damage the competitiveness of the united states and the global economy, and i urge my colleagues to extend this vital job-creating tax credit before it expires. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentle
doing to get it back? we're drilling for more oil at home. that could mean more jobs. today the energy information administration said american crude oil production averaged 6.5 million barrels a day in september. that is the best, people, in 15 years. and now our fifth story "outfront." >>> we go from a good story to a bad one. the fiscal cliff. dissension within the ranks. it seems not recall republican lawmakers and conservative groufs are in lockstep with john boehner. earlier i spoke with one gop house member who hasn't been on the same wave length as the speaker recently. he's in senior leadership. here's what deputy whip congressman tom cole told me about those who in the party say taxes shouldn't be on the table. >> for those who say we're putting revenue on the table, the american people did that when they lented, you know, the president and a democratic senate again. again, they have to agree to a deal or tax rates on everybody go up. i think we shouldn't -- we should do everything we can to avoid that for as many people as we possibly can. >> "outfront" tonight, grover norq
know that if you would police this information and reporting requirements by the energy information agency, that we could have a better analysis of what is causing undue spikes in the market. we have a lot of analysis that shows that it is not supply and demand. so, when it's something as critical as the price of gasoline, you know, there's more regulation on commodities like hamburger than there is right now on gasoline. and i can tell you gasoline is a lot more important to an economy than the kinds of transparencies that we have in the commodities market. >> now there was at one point i think one or more refinery fires and that was one explanation given at a certain stage and also the seasonal adjustments when they are switching over from home heating to gasoline. but you don't think that any of those factors are what really caused these spikes some. >> well, what happened is one refinery had a fire. that was in the state of washington. and when prices almost went to $5, people were saying, how does one refinery cause that kind of spike? and all the other refineries responded wit
put $16,000 in total. so i think that there is just very little energy in american life to uphold marijuana prohibition. the more complicated question both in marijuana and when it comes to other drugs is if we're willing to declare the war on drugs not a success to say that something has failed, what are we doing instead. legalization is not really an option for harder drugs. and so the kind of questions that the president elect of mexico are confronting and that police commissioners are confronting in the united states are what is a kind of mored in earn way to take the war on drugs if we're willing to say that things have not worked so far, but we're not willing to radically legalize. >> general mccaffrey, there was a blue ribbon panel this summer that concluded that the war on drugs has failed, although they say with devastating consequences. to benjamin's point, is there a more modern way to fight this war? >> well, by the way, i congratulate him on his article. it's one of the more thoughtful things i've read in a spate of nonsense that has been published. i'm out here in se
an energy ceo. the district covers all of southeast missouri. 62, at the first woman office in mike in washington,an independent caller, what are your thoughts on this? caller: you know, i have my doubts about a lot of things these days. one thing i wanted to mention is every time we have a situation where there was going to be a government shutdown, they put the fear in everybody and then at the last minute they come up with something, and now they are talking about the fiscal cliff. i guarantee you miraculously at the end of the month they are going to come up with something. they are going to finally get their act together and decide on what is they have to get done. this happens all the time, year after year. i feel that when they are talking about entitlements -- i am a veteran. when they start talking about that, it makes you feel like you are a charity case if you are getting benefits. there are many people out there i know who could have volunteered to go to iraq but they did not do that. i did. other people with disabilities and people who have paid into social security, i
to president barack obama, major philip may, regional administrator for region four of the federal energy management agency, mr. george "tony" robinson region six federal emergency management agency, ellen darcy, assistant secretary of the army for the corps of engineers. mr. william craig fugate, administrator for the federal emergency management agency, mr. andrew velazquez, regional administrator, reasonon five for the federal emergency management agency, ms. beth freeman, regional administrator region seven for the federal emergency management agency, in which we point out this impending problem. . now i'm not the only one talking about this. every member of congress along that corridor are receiving phone calls, letters, emails, we have all sorts of groups out there very much worried about this problem needing to be solved. and it can be solved. but it appears that the corps of engineers has an annual operating plan. and this annual operating plan determines how much water they are table release from the missouri river into the mississippi river in the wintertime. and i understand th
out, how do we effectively and efficiently use your energy and your passion so we get something done? i was listening to you, mr. blaxill. basically, if i understood you correctly, it seems as if you feel that there has been a lot of game play -- i do not know if you use the word fraud, but you came pretty close. you know, as i listen to you, i think about how these numbers are increasing. we are marching into a very, very serious situation. i know you said do not call it an epidemic or whatever you said, but this is serious stuff. you have got -- i'm just listening to you. i am sure you have got parents who have to give a lot. their productivity is affected. we have got people who are struggling with this, and not getting the services that i guess could make them even more productive, and i right? that is what you are saying? >> it is. i do want to reinforce -- this is in fact very serious. my concern with the rhetoric of epidemic is that it seems to stand in contravention to a growing amount of science exploring whether or not we are seeing a rise in incidents or a rise in diagnosi
makes us boom for 0 years. we don't have that. energy is great we have a lot of good things and there are things that can help us. it's hard to predict. we can product if that doesn't happen, growth of entitlements just gets worse and worse and something has to give. >> so here you are, you know, perched as professor in beautiful cambridge, massachusetts -- >> it's dark at the moment. >> because of the power outages. nonetheless you're watching this dance, we were just talking to congressman hoyer and he himself said let's get real. there are very real consequences here. we looked at the gdp position yesterday, third quarter was better than anticipated, housing has been up as christine's reported. so those are all great signs thus far but if this thing doesn't work out, it's frightening. >> that's exactly right. i mean it's already hurting the fourth quarter number, and it's going to look worse. businesses don't know what's going to happen. if you were thinking of doing an investment, why would you do it now until you see what's going to happen? there seems like so much posi
is not true of most preserved areas of china. there's no energy exploration allowed which is also not common. >> skiing with siberian tigers, kind of like doing a show with mika every day? >> i will not answer that question without it here. condi nast, kevin doyle. thank you for bringing some good news on the requiremental front out of china. god knows over the past 20 years they have needed to turn the corner. it sounds like they're starting the do that. we appreciate you being with us. coming up next, business before the bell with brian shactman. keep it right here on "morning joe." tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lipper categories. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lower than spdr tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and even lower than vanguard. tdd#:
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)